Paris

Paris is often referred to as "The City of Light" both because of its leading role during the Age of Enlightenment, and more literally because Paris was one of the first European cities to adopt gas street lighting. In the 1860s, the boulevards and streets of Paris were illuminated by 56,000 gas lamps.

Notable architectural landmarks of Paris include Notre Dame Cathedral; the Sainte-Chapelle; and the Eiffel Tower.

Parc des Buttes-Chaumont

The Parc des Buttes-Chaumont was opened in 1867, late in the regime of Emperor Napoleon III, and was built by Jean-Charles Alphand, who created all the major parks of Napoleon III. The most famous feature of the park is the Temple de la Sibylle, inspired by the Temple of Vesta in Tivoli, Italy, perched at the top of a cliff fifty metres above the waters of an artificial lake.

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Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower. Constructed in 1889 as the entrance to the World's Fair, it was initially criticized by some of France's leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but has become a global cultural icon of France.

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Musée Rodin

The Musée Rodin at the Hôtel Biron contains most of Rodin's significant creations, including The Thinker, The Kiss and The Gates of Hell. Many of his sculptures are displayed in the museum's extensive garden. The gardens around the museum building contain many of the famous sculptures in natural settings.

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